Sightmark Signal DNV Monoculars: Hunt the Night

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2018/02/14) – New Sightmark Signal Digital Night Vision Monoculars are helping people see flawlessly at both day and night. With two different models, the 320RT 4.5×30 (SM18024) and 340RT 4.5×30 (SM18025), seeing in pure darkness (up to 380 yards away!) has never been easier.

Digital night vision monoculars
See up to 380 yards away in total darkness!
Digital night vision monoculars
New enhanced digital night vision has built-in video recording with sound.

Replacing the popular Ranger Digital Monocular series, the Signal lineup hits shelves packed with enhanced features. A new and improved high-sensitivity 640×480 CMOS sensor and high-resolution 640×480 LCD display ensure night time and low light performance. Both models feature available built-in video recording with sound, allowing users to take images and videos to show their friends or upload to the internet. The Signal can even stream directly to your smartphone or tablet for remote view via the Stream Vision app.

For ultimate stealth and discretion, the Signal 340RT’s 940nm IR illuminator produces no glow and is practically invisible to wildlife. Though not entirely invisible, the powerful 850nm IR illuminator found on Signal 320RT models gives viewers 50 more yards of detection range at night. Signals boast 2x digital zoom, enabling up to 9x magnification for up-close and personal viewing. Sightmark Signal Digital Night Vision Monoculars include carrying case, user manual, USB cable, neck strap and lens cloth.

Truck Guns

Recently, I’ve been considering getting myself a truck gun. Not too long ago, I had an important birthday and bought myself a new expensive carry gun. It’s not one I’m willing to leave unattended in my car, so I feel like I need a beater gun for when I’m on road trips or toolin’ around town going in and out of places where I can’t legally carry. Having a truck gun also allows me the opportunity to have something close at hand that holds more rounds in a bigger caliber than my .380. Plus, what if I have to get out of Dodge ASAP with no time to run home and get the big guns?

Some of you are probably already shaking their heads saying, “why doesn’t she just carry a bigger gun?” Well, it gets hot—and I mean really hot—in North Texas. Work- and weather-appropriate clothing prevents me from comfortably carrying a full-sized 9mm, .40 or .45 that holds 9 rounds or more. Also, what’s the actual probability I will EVER need more than 14 rounds in a self-defense situation? So, no, I’m not thinking about getting a car gun in anticipation of a firefight. I want it because…reasons. And sometimes you need a “valid” excuse to give your significant other when you buy a new gun. Amiright?

I don’t know, maybe it’s my upbringing, but truck guns just make sense to me. My desire for one is threefold—for self-defense when I don’t have my EDC, as backup to my EDC and as my SHTF gun.

What is a Truck Gun?

A truck gun is a gun you designate as the one you keep in your vehicle.

Typically, truck guns are:

  1. A rifle or shotgun
  2. Affordable to cheap in price
  3. Chambered for a caliber that takes down game
  4. Incredibly rugged
  5. Simple
  6. Easy to store
  7. Reliable

I grew up in small-town Arkansas. Back then, truck guns were literally just that—a shotgun or hunting rifle hung on a rack in plain view in your truck. Truck guns weren’t just commonplace, they were almost religion. It was never a threatening gesture and it never scared anyone. I mean, you never know when you’ll happen upon a trophy buck or gobbler.

You don’t have to have a truck to have a truck gun. You can keep a gun in your SUV, minivan, Tesla, Smart Car or whatever it is you drive on the reg. It just means a gun you specifically designate as the one you keep in your vehicle. Typically, a truck gun, or beater gun, is an affordable to down-right cheap rifle or shotgun. It needs to be tough, reliable and easy to shoot. Unless you take it to the range often, a get-home gun won’t see a lot of action, so you want to pick something that doesn’t need a lot of maintenance and if the off chance it was stolen, you aren’t losing too much if you never get it back.

A truck gun needs to be easy to store, as well—under the seat or tucked away in the trunk—so bad guys who peep in windows won’t know it’s there.

Another requirement is that its handy and easy to use in a caliber that stops varmints and predators—four-legged, two-legged and ones that slither—and can also bring meat to the campfire in a survival situation. It’s gotta be fairly lightweight, so if I had to ditch the car and hike it on foot, I can sling it over my shoulder without it being a burden. It needs to be simple to clean, field strip and operate. And it especially needs to shoot straight enough to hit what I’m pointing at. I’m also going to need to like this gun. With any gun, you need to remain proficient with it—which means practice and training. Trust me, there’s no point in holding onto a firearm you dread shooting.

It’s a lot to ask of one gun. Fortunately, there are plenty of guns that meet my criteria to choose from.

These are my top choices:

Before you start to argue, remember that what is best for me is not necessarily best for you. You might want to consider a lever-action or a bolt-action rifle. I know plenty of shooters who prefer an old military surplus truck gun like the SKS, others pick a big-bore revolver.

I can’t tell you which one would be “best,” because “best” is all relative. If you drive around in the desert all day, you probably want something geared more toward rattlers. If you are in the mountains, you’ll probably want to consider a bigger caliber than I need for bears and such. It all just depends on your situation, where you live and what’s comfortable for you. I narrowed my list down to these six.

Kel-Tec SU-16C

Kel-Tec SU-16C rifle with integral bipod
The Kel-Tech SU-16C is the perfect truck gun with it’s integral bipod and folding stock.

The Kel-Tec SU-16C is chambered in 5.56/.223, folds up to 25.5 inches and weighs 4.7 pounds.

Pros:

  • I already have plenty of .223 ammo.
  • It accepts standard AR-15 magazines, which again, I have plenty of.
  • Simple design with few parts.
  • It’s accurate.
  • I thoroughly enjoy shooting it.

Cons:

The average price of $650 is more than I want to pay.

Chiappa PAK-9

Black, short pistol-sized 9mm that looks and is based on the AK-47 platform.
The new Chiappa is based on the AK-47 and chambered for 9mm.

You might want to consider a pistol-caliber carbine that shares ammo and mag compatibility with your regular handgun.  The Chiappa PAK-9 is based on the AK-platform, chambered for 9mm and accepts Glock and Beretta mags. It is 14.47 inches long and weighs 6 pounds.

Pros:

  • It chews up and spits out cheap ammo fed outta cheap mags.
  • It accepts standard AK furniture.
  • All I have to do is add a cheap red dot and I’m good to go.
  • At the time of publication, there was one listed on Gun Broker for less than $400. Other online gun shops had them priced at $430.

Cons:

Reliability. It was introduced just a year ago, so I’m not sure how well the Chiappa PAK-9 is made.

Mossberg 590 Shockwave

Short barreled, 14" non-NFA firearm the Mossberg 590 Shockwave with bird's head pistol grip
The Mossberg 590 Shockwave with 14″ barrel is a Non-NFA firearm.

The Shockwave rocked the shooting world at SHOT Show 2017 due to its 14-inch barrel. It’s a Non-NFA firearm according to the BATFE. It has a bird’s head pistol grip, available in 12 or 20 gauge, holds 6 rounds, is 26.37 inches long, and weighs only 5.3 pounds.

Pros:

  • It is based on the trustworthy and reliable Mossberg 590 action.
  • A shotgun has a lot of versatility.
  • I found the Shockwave currently going for $360.

Cons:

It takes practice getting comfortable shooting it reliably and accurately.

Hi-Point Carbine

Pink camo Hi-Point carbine chambered in .380 ACP
The Hi-Point works and is super affordable.

The Hi-Point is 31 inches long, weighs 6.25 pounds and is 100% made in America.

Pros:

  • I found a .380 ACP Hi-Point Carbine listed as low as $264—the cheapest on my list.
  • It shares ammo with my EDC.
  • It works.
  • I don’t mind if it gets dinged up and scratched.

Cons:

It’s big, so finding a place to store it would be challenging.

Ruger 10/22 Takedown

Black synthetic stock Ruger 10/22 semiauto rifle Take Down model.
An old stand-by—the Ruger 10/22.

Offered in quite a variety of models, the Ruger 10/22 Takedown is chambered for .22 Long Rifle and breaks down into two pieces.

Pros:

  • It is simple to operate and virtually has no recoil.
  • The Ruger 10/22 is undoubtedly accurate and reliable.
  • Its shares caliber capability with another one of my rifles.

Cons:

You must put the thing together for it to work, so this isn’t a grab- and go-ready rifle. Even though you can get mags that hold 25 rounds, you still have a gun chambered for only .22 LR and ammo isn’t as cheap or as readily available as it used to be.

AK-47

Century AK-47
Ahhhh…the AK-47. Is any gun collection complete without one?

I’ve had an AK-47 on my list of guns to own for a very long time now and this provides the perfect opportunity to finally pull the trigger on getting one.

Pros:

  • The AKs a beast.
  • Ammo is cheap.

Cons:

AK-47. Cool. Okay, but what model? Which one do I pick? I don’t know because AKs aren’t so cheap anymore.

Safety First

You don’t ever want to ‘set it and forget’ your truck gun. Not only for safety reasons but because of temperature extremes, coastal environments and maintenance. There are some environments where guns are more susceptible to corrosion than others. A well-taken care of firearm is a functioning firearm.

As part of the Project Child Safe initiative, the National Shooting Sports Foundation reminds us that responsible gun ownership includes making sure our firearms don’t fall into the wrong hands. If you are going to keep a gun in the car, lock it up and keep it out of sight. There are plenty of reputable companies that make gun safes specifically for your car—GunVault, Bulldog Cases, Titan Security Products and TruckVault. God forbid your gun ever gets stolen and is used in a crime.

You should always remove your gun from your car overnight and keep it secure inside the house.

Truck guns are about function and utility. It is all about the work they can do. It doesn’t have to be pretty—in fact, it will probably get dinged and scratched riding around in the car. It doesn’t have to have the latest and greatest handguards or accessory. Old-school Weaver and Picatinny rails will do just fine to attach affordable optics. It doesn’t even have to be brand new. A used gun in good condition will more than suffice for this purpose. Now, it just about which one I can find for the best price.

Do you have a truck gun? What is it and why did you choose it? If not, which truck guns would you consider? Tell us in the comment section.

Boresighting a Pistol

 “When you read about “accuracy” of any given handgun, know that unless machines are involved, what you’re really getting is an indication of that pistol’s ability to be shot accurately. — Tom McHale Shooting Illustrated

When we say a pistol is ‘accurate,’ we mean it consistently hits where we aim. A lot goes into whether a gun is accurate. The barrel, fittings and how precisely-machined all the parts affect accuracy. The sighting system affects accuracy. But we can’t blame all accuracy issues on the pistol. Most accuracy problems originate with you, the shooter. If you have the fundamentals of pistol shooting down—your aim, stance, grip and how you manipulate the trigger—than you should be shooting pretty darn straight. If you are still having problems punching holes into holes from a self-defense distance (10 feet and under), there just might be an issue with the gun.

So, where do you begin?

Inserting a laser boresight into a Ruger pistol
Increase your accuracy with Sightmark’s in-chamber boresights.

Let’s start by inspecting the sighting system you have on your gun—iron sights, night sights, lasers and red dots all need sighting-in to make sure they are aligned properly. Surprisingly, a lot of us just compensate our aim to match that of our gun’s sights from the factory. For example, if your sights are off, which they could very well be, we simply just shoot low left, or high right—whichever way your sights are set—to hit bullseye. It is not good to compensate our aim for offset optics or sights.

Why does accuracy matter?

To stop a threat, you must be able to hit vital organs. Inaccuracy could mean the bad guy wins.

What Happens to Your Body During a Self-Defense Shooting

When we are faced with a threat, our bodies dump adrenaline, norepinephrine and cortisol into our bloodstream, preparing us to either stay and fight or run. Our heart rate, blood pressure and breathing increase, our pupils dilate and our muscles tense. This dump of hormones can cause memory problems, loss of hearing and create tunnel vision.

In a self-defense situation, you won’t be able to take your time to aim. You won’t focus on the front sight. That is why we put lasers, red dots and high-visibility aftermarket sights on our handguns. Anytime we get a new handgun or a new sighting system, we need to make sure our sights or optic is centered with the bore. This makes your gun more accurate. An in-chamber boresight is a perfect way to do this and saves you time and money.

What is a Laser Boresight?

Zero your pistol from 15-100 yards.

A laser boresight is a preliminary method of getting your sights dialed in without using a lot of ammo at the range. Using a laser diode, it projects a red dot on a target, making it easier for you to center your sights and optics. Sightmark’s pistol boresights are caliber-specific and placed directly in your firearm’s chamber.

How to Boresight a Pistol

Using a pistol boresight is simple.

  1. Unload your firearm and pointing it in a safe direction, stabilize it using a benchrest or shooting bags.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Unscrew the bottom of the boresight and insert the batteries according to the instructions. The boresight automatically turns on when the batteries are inserted correctly.
  4. Put the laser boresight into the chamber.
  5. Close the slide.
  6. Line the laser beam on to the center of the target.
  7. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the crosshairs or dot until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight. If you do not have an optic and just want to calibrate your sights, aim as you would regularly and then use a pistol sight adjustment tool to correct for windage and elevation.

As mentioned above, most inaccuracy problems can’t be blamed on the gun. There are a few things we can do besides improving our own technique to help increase accuracy. Accuracy isn’t just for precision shooters or competitors. Accurate is something we must all aim to be. For a small price to pay and a few minutes, a laser boresight might just make all the difference.

Pick your laser boresight out by clicking here.

Do you have any tips on how to improve accuracy? Help other shooters and leave them below in the comment section.

Zero Your Handgun With Sightmark’s New .380 ACP Laser Boresight!

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2018/01/30) – Worry no more, .380 ACP owners—Sightmark has your zeroing needs covered with their redesigned .380 ACP Laser Boresight (SM39046). The perfect tool for boresighting and zeroing your pistol from 15-100 yards, this unit is more compact than the previous model, helping to fit into more compact .380 ACP handguns.

Inserting a laser boresight into a Ruger pistol
Increase your accuracy with Sightmark’s in-chamber boresights.

Far more accurate than a muzzle-attached boresight, the Sightmark .380 ACP Laser Boresight chambers directly in your firearm, just like a normal round, allowing precision accuracy when sighting in. The boresight’s brass construction helps not only with durability, but also improves chambering and ejection. Extremely lightweight and no larger than a standard .380 ACP bullet, this boresight is easily stored for use at the range or ranch. The .380 ACP Boresight provides 1 hour of battery life from two AG5 batteries and includes batteries and a carrying case.

Zero your pistol from 15-100 yards.

How to Boresight a Rifle

When you purchase a new optic for your rifle, that optic is not going to be accurate right out of the box. Before depending on your optic to help you hit exactly where you mean, you’ll have to zero it. Sighting in your scope can take a long time and waste a lot of ammo. Fortunately, there is a solution.

There is a more efficient and faster way of zeroing in a new optic. By using a laser boresight, you save time and money by making sighting-in much faster without using any ammo!

Bore sighting is a reliable way to align your reticle, sights and scope’s crosshairs with the true center of the gun’s barrel—which is the bore. Boresights use a laser diode to project a dot on a target much like a laser pointer, making it easy to see when your crosshairs align with the laser. Since the two run parallel to each other, they can only truly zero at a given distance. This is typically 25 yards.

You can bore sight any firearm—AR-15 and other MSWs, shotgun, bolt-action, and handguns. Bore sighting also works on any sighting system—red dot, reflex, riflescopes, holograph and even your iron or night sights.

There are two different types of laser boresights—one you put directly into the chamber and one you insert into the barrel.

In-Chamber

In-chamber boresights are inserted directly into your gun’s chamber, so they must be caliber-specific and made to the same dimensions and specs as a cartridge in that caliber. These types of boresights are the most accurate. These can, however, become costly If you have firearms in multiple calibers that you need to sight in, because you must purchase a separate boresight for each caliber.

Man inserting a brass-cased in-chamber Sightmark boresight into his AR-15.
In-chamber boresights are accurate and easy to use.

Laser boresight cartridges are easy to use. You simply turn them on and insert it into the chamber of your firearm like you would a live round or snap cap.

Sightmark in-chamber boresights are superior to competitors, due to the multiple set screws that lock in the laser diode, ensuring the laser stays straight and centered. To test an in-chamber boresight’s accuracy, roll your laser boresight on a flat surface, the laser should stay straight along the wall as you roll it. If the dot rotates, you know the diode is canted and you won’t be able to accurately zero-in your scope.

Made of high-quality brass, the Sightmark boresights are calibrated to make sure the laser is true to center, and measure precisely the same specs as a live round. The extensive offerings include 12- and 20-gauge shotgun, the most popular self-defense handgun calibers, and over 30 different hunting, defense, sporting, and popular rifle calibers—including .223/5.56, .308, .50, .300 BLK and 6.5 Creedmoor.

Using an In-Chamber Boresight

  1. Use a benchrest, shooting bags, or other platform that stabilizes your gun. Make sure the firearm is completely unloaded and pointed in a safe direction.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Remove the batteries from the boresight packaging and unscrew the bottom of the boresight. Insert the two batteries according to the instructions. The boresight will automatically turn on when the batteries are inserted correctly.
  4. Lock your bolt open to the rear.
  5. Put the laser boresight into the chamber.
  6. You may close the bolt or leave it open.
  7. Line the laser beam on to the center of the target.
  8. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the reticle, dot or crosshairs until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight.

Universal Boresights

Other boresights are either attached or inserted into the barrel. Most boresights that you must insert into the barrel come with a set of arbors that will modify the boresight to fit different barrel sizes. These types of boresights are the most affordable, but they do come with some disadvantages.

  • Arbors are small and can get lost easily. They also wear out and break.
  • The entire boresight itself can play against the barrel, causing inaccuracy.
  • Safety concerns. Forgetting to remove a boresight from the barrel can result in a catastrophic accident.
Image shows a rifle with a barrel blown up in three pieces, split down the center from a forgotten in-barrel boresight
This barrel blew up when a competitor’s boresight was forgotten inside.

Sightmark’s universal boresights provide a much safer way to boresight if you prefer this type of boresight over an in-chamber boresighter. If you have looked at any firearm failure montages or spent any good deal of time on gun blogs and forums, you have probably seen the blown-up barrel caused by an in-barrel boresight. Our universal laser boresights securely stay on your rifle, shotgun, or pistol via a heavy-duty magnet. Only a small portion of the arbor goes inside the barrel. They incorporate a self-centering arbor, so you never have to worry about losing pieces or breaking parts. They will sight in firearms .17 to .50 caliber.

 

Using the Universal Boresight and Universal Boresight Pro

  1. Use a benchrest, shooting bags, or other platform that stabilizes your gun. Make sure the firearm is completely unloaded and point it in a safe direction.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Remove the Universal Boresight from the package. Turn the unit on. To preserve battery life, the Universal Boresight Pro will only activate when the arbor is pressed in when it is attached to the barrel.
  4. Remove any suppressor or muzzle device you have on your firearm.
  5. Simply attach the boresight to the end of the barrel.
  6. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the reticle, dot or crosshairs until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight.

It’s as easy as that!

Now, you are ready to head to the range to make precise adjustments to your riflescope. It shouldn’t take but a few rounds to zero it in.

You will want to bore sight your firearm any time you get a new optic, upgrade factory sights, for a competition, before hunting, and on a firearm that has been in storage.

Click here to buy boresights from Sightmark.

Do you have questions about boresights? Leave them below and we will do our best to answer them.

How to Shoot with a Red Dot Sight

Once upon a time, a red dot sight meant exactly that—a sight that projects an illuminated red dot as an aiming point onto an objective lens. It is now a generic term most shooters use to describe a type of weapon sight that uses any illuminated color aiming dot or another shape for the reticle. Many red dot sights will illuminate green and offer different reticle choices other than just a dot with an outer ring. The appeal of the red dot sight is its simplistic operation and accuracy. Beginners to professional competitors thoroughly appreciate all the benefits illuminated dot sights give them.

Black open-style reflex sight mounted to a GLOCK with a Coyote tan frame
Red dot or reflex sights project an illuminated red or green dot or another shaped reticle for super quick target acquisition.

There are a few different types of red dot sights—reflex, tube, prismatic, and holographic. The difference in the types is how the sight works to project the reticle. Reflex and tube sights use a reflective glass lens and an LED, prismatic sights use prisms and holographic sights use a laser. Sightmark makes three of these sights—reflective, prismatic, and tube.

Dot sights offer shooters a great advantage—speed! Target acquisition with these types of optics is quicker and far easier than with iron sights or magnified scopes. That is because they can reflect the reticle’s projection in parallel with the sight’s optical axis, ensuring the point of aim and point of impact always coincide. They are designed so the reticle is always in focus when pointed at your target. There is no aligning of sights and no adjusting for different distances. The dot stays in focus no matter the distance of the target.

Using Your Red Dot for the First Time

Turn on the unit and check to make sure it is working. Depending on the environment, adjust the brightness of the reticle using the knob or brightness adjustment buttons. If you are shooting indoors or in low-light situations, your reticle will appear fuzzy or have a halo effect if it is too bright. Alternatively, if you don’t have the brightness up high enough outdoors or in bright light, your reticle will disappear.

Mounting

Sightmark reflex, red dot and prismatic sights offer unlimited eye relief. Eye relief is the distance between the eyepiece and what your eyes see in the field of view. Red dots can be placed anywhere on your that gun that is most comfortable for you and reduces your line of the sight the most. For many, this is centered above the AR-15’s ejection port.

Man looking through a red dot sight mounted on an AR-15.
Red dot sights allow you to hit exactly where you need to, exactly when you need to.

When you have mounted, checked and corrected the brightness, you’re ready to shoot. (Always know your target and what’s behind it!)

  1. Look at your target.
  2. While remaining focused on your target, bring your gun up to the shooting position.
  3. Keep both eyes open.
  4. You will see the reticle move onto your target as you are bringing up your gun to shoot.
  5. Fire when the reticle meets the point you want to hit.

Once you have used your red dot for the first time, you will be able to quickly engage a target every time after.

Aiming a red dot is simple and fast. The reticle corrects itself and they are virtually parallax-free. Parallax is the visual movement of the reticle in relation to the target. When you move your head, the reticle will appear to move. Parallax is caused by the reticle not focusing at the same distance as the target. Sightmark’s dot sights are parallax-free anywhere from 10 to 25 yards to infinity. No sight is 100% parallax-free, as parallax will occur at closer distances.

Open-style reflex sight mounted a GLOCK pistol
Dot sights will fit on any gun with a rail. Mounted on a self-defense gun, a reflex sight gives you the tactical advantage.

Dot, reflex and prismatic sights are made for close quarters, close range, and for self-defense. They allow you to keep focused on the most important part—the target. With fast target acquisition and an accurate point of aim and shot placement, you hit exactly where you need to, exactly when you need to.

These sights offer an advantage over others because they allow you to remain situationally aware. You still can see your surroundings with their wide field of view and while aiming with both eyes open. When using a reflex sight with both eyes open, your dominant eye views the reticle and the target while the non-dominant eye is only viewing the target.  If the reflex sight’s line of sight to the target becomes blocked by debris, the dominant eye still sees the reticle.  The brain will continue to overlay the images of both eyes, and in this case, the reticle image of the dominant eye will be overlaid with the target image of the non-dominant eye.

Undoubtedly, red dot and reflex sights help you be a better shooter. They fit on any gun with a rail—handguns, shotguns, rifles…even bolt-action. Even though most reflex sights, apart from Sightmark’s prismatic sights, do not magnify, there are many units that are magnifier-compatible, as well as night vision-compatible. This versatility allows you to engage targets at further distances over 50 yards, as well as getting a close-range night vision scope for a very affordable price.

Unless you are long-distance precision shooting, there is no reason not to have one. With a red dot, you’ll spend more time hitting targets and less time wasting ammo.

Reflex, tube, prismatic, holographic? Which one did you choose and why? Tell us what you like and don’t like about it below in the comments.

 

 

 

Hunt Day and Night with Photon RT Digital Scope

Night vision optics like Sightmark’s Photon RT digital riflescopes and the sensors used in these devices have come a long way in a short period of time. Traditional night vision optics generally referred to as Gen 1, Gen 2 and Gen 3, have lost a ton of ground to digital night vision over the past several years, partly because of improved imaging and partly because of versatility.

Downed black wild boar
Take the Photon from day to night hunting.

While traditional night vision devices would have suffered irreparable damage if used during daylight, today’s digital riflescopes are perfectly compatible with daytime use. In fact, Sightmark Photon RT series digital scopes incorporate a special scope cover with a peephole designed to allow the perfect amount of light into the optic for crisp, richly contrasting digital imaging.

Hunt till You Drop!

Why is this important? It’s critically important, at least to Texans and an increasing number of forward-thinking states, because hunters can now use digital scopes like the Photon to hunt deer during daylight hours, then shift automatically to night hunting for feral hogs, predators and varmints. Like weekend-warrior football, playing both offense and defense, I like to call it “iron man hunting.” Honestly, if you can handle it, your hunt can last a solid 24 hours… or longer. Hunt until you drop!

Man hunting with a rifle with night vision scope mounted to it. He's wearing camo and a hunter safety orange vest
The Photon scopes have improved sensors and a 640×480 AMOLED display.

Until recently, the Sightmark Photon XT 4.5×42 was a favorite digital night vision riflescope among hunters. For a mere $500, you could have quality digital night vision, also compatible with daytime hunting, with imaging on par with Gen 1+, encroaching on Gen 2. Hunters jumped at the game-changing opportunity. Even better, the Photon XT included video-out capability, so hunters enjoyed more success and were capturing memories forever. Unfortunately, the video quality could be better, and people have struggled with finding seriously reliable DVR recorders capable of handling recoil.

Sightmark RT digital riflescopes are successors to the long-reigning Photon XT. Sightmark’s new Photon RT digital line of optics includes an improved sensor and 640×480 AMOLED display for detailed imaging for both day hunting, as well as night hunting. The Photon RT also features built-in video recording, an increased detection range compared to Sightmark Photon XT scopes, more powerful onboard infrared illumination, and Stream Vision App-compatible WiFi for viewing the display on a connected smartphone or tablet, remote control, transferring files, and downloading firmware upgrades. The Sightmark Photon RT digital riflescope even includes onboard video, eliminating the need for problematic DVRs, or pesky cables and really improves video quality.

Iron Man Hunting… Just How We Like it in Texas

Picture of three deer.
In Texas, we are allowed to hunt deer during the day with digital scopes.

If you’re down our way and think you’re up for a little iron-man hunting yourself, think about what types of optics may best fit your needs. It certainly makes sense to consider a day/night rifle scope designed for both day and night use to eliminate unnecessary trips in and out of the woods to change equipment.

Click here to shop the Photon line of digital riflescopes.

Do you use a digital night vision scope when you hunt during the day? If so, tell us your experiences about it in the comment section.

 

Sightmark Introduces Revamped Ultra Shot line: RAM Series

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/12/15) – Sightmark is proud to announce the release of the latest generation of Ultra Shot reflex sights, ripe with upgrades and a fresh new design. With three available models; R, A and M-Spec, Sightmark has created resilient close-range optics perfect for everything from target shooting to law enforcement and military operations on both AR platform firearms and shotguns. All RAM series sights are now powered by a CR123A battery, which provides superior battery life (200-2,000 hours) over other red dots and reflex sights. A wide lens quickens target acquisition while helping to maintain a wide FOV.  Quick-detach models include an improved QD lever allowing a low profile to keep the sights from snagging on gear or unlatching during the heat of the moment.

Sightmark Ultra Shot reflex sight
The newest Ultra Shot is fully upgraded to exceed all of your expectations.

Ideal for target shooting and hunting, the Ultra Shot R-Spec (SM26031), or Range Spec, features four reticle options with red or green illumination and a new low battery indication which prompts the reticle to blink when the battery is low. The R-Spec boasts 10 brightness levels, from low light to sunny outdoors, and slotted windage and elevation adjustments, able to be changed with a flathead or common tool.

The new aluminum-constructed Ultra Shot A-Spec (SM26032), or Advanced Spec model, retains many of the same updates found in the R-Spec, but adds six night vision settings, allowing the sight to be used in conjunction with night vision devices. Shockproof up to 8 ft., the R-Spec is shielded by a sturdy aluminum alloy housing and protective aluminum shield.

The most durable and advanced sights in the Ultra Shot line, the new M-Spec FMS (SM26035) and M-Spec LQD (SM26034) were designed for law enforcement, hunting and competition shooting scenarios. Waterproof up to 40 ft. and able to withstand up to .50 BMG caliber recoil, M-Specs feature motion-sensing activation (5-minute shutoff with motion activation, 12-hour auto-off) to conserve battery life but still keep the optics ready for when they need to be. These cutting-edge reflex sights have an integrated retractable sunshade that reduces lens glare and protects the optics during rain or snow.

Click here to check out the RAM series.

 

 

Introducing the Versatile Mini Shot M-Spec from Sightmark

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/12/06) – Joining an established line of reflex sights and red dots, the highly-anticipated Mini Shot M-Spec FMS (SM26043) from Sightmark is finally here. This all-purpose reflex sight is Sightmark’s most compact yet and utilizes an included low-profile mount or AR riser mount to fit perfectly on a variety of firearms, including pistols, shotguns, ARs and AKs. Though it was designed specifically for law enforcement, the Mini Shot M-Spec is also ideal for competition shooting, hunting and home defense applications.

Compact red dot sight mounted on an AR riser fixed mount
The brand new Mini Shot M-Spec is Sightmark’s most compact reflex sight to date.
Rear view of a compact reflex sight.
Recoil rated up to .375 H&H. This is one tough reflex sight.

The Mini Shot M-Spec’s extremely low power consumption provides 300-30,000 hours of battery life, depending on power setting, from a single CR1632 battery. 100% waterproof, this compact reflex sight’s aluminum housing with steel protective shield makes it one of the most durable reflex sights on the market. But the M-Spec wasn’t just designed to be rugged, it is also incredibly user-friendly due to ambidextrous digital switch controls that allow both left- and right-handed shooters to turn on its 3 MOA reticle. Forget the special tools, as windage and elevation adjustments can be made at the click of a button. The Mini Shot’s versatility doesn’t end with the firearm it can be mounted to, either—10 brightness levels allow the sight to be used anywhere from extremely low-light situations to bright sunny conditions.

Recoil rated up to .375 H&H, this unique sight boasts a 12-hour auto shut-off feature to help save battery. With an MSRP of $249.99, the Mini Shot is a no-brainer for shooters looking for a tough, small-sized reflex sight. The Mini Shot M-Spec FMS includes rubber cover, low profile fixed mount, AR riser fixed mount, battery and manual.

 

Sightmark Launches New Element 1×30 Red Dot Sight

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/12/06) Delivering tough-to-beat accuracy and a crisp, wide field of view, the new Sightmark Element 1×30 (SM26040) is an update to the popular Tactical Red Dot Sight (SM13041). Enhancements include a smaller, more precise 2-MOA red dot, improved brightness settings and two night vision compatibility modes.

Element red dot sight on mount
Sightmark meets customers’ demands with the new, upgraded Element red dot sight.

Sightmark has integrated improvements based on customer suggestions and added more of their own, including a longer range of adjustment for both windage and elevation, battery life (up to 15,000 hours) and an improved IP67 waterproof rating. Notably, the Elements’ windage and elevation caps can now be flipped and used as tools for making adjustments.

Shipping with a reliable cantilever mount, the Element 1×30 absolute co-witness height fits all magnifiers set up on the Aimpoint T1 mounting system, allowing shooters to engage targets at further distances. The Sightmark Element 1×30 red dot sight includes flip-up lens covers, a manual and a CR2032 battery in the box.

 

 

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